Publication by IG Member – Access to Socio-Economic Rights for Refugees: A Comparison Across Six African Countries

Sergio Carciotto and IG member Cristiano d’Orsi have published a report for the Scalabrini Institute For Human Mobility In Africa titled ‘Access to Socio-Economic Rights for Refugees: A Comparison Across Six African Countries’. The comparison covers the DRC, Ethiopia, Kenya, Nigeria, South-Africa and Sudan.

In 2015, according to the UNHCR, more than 65 million people across the globe had left their homes in search of protection from conflicts, wars and persecutions. At the end of the same year, on the African continent (Central and Great Lakes, East and Horn, Southern Africa, and Western Africa) the UNHCR counted a total of 4 431 500 refugees, 1 293 014 asylum-seekers and 10 762 882 internally displaced persons (IDPs). Furthermore, Ethiopia is the African country hosting the highest number of refugees (736 086), South Africa is the country with the highest number of asylum-seekers (1 096 063) and Sudan is the country with the highest number of IDPs (3 218 234).

Despite the fact that human mobility in Sub-Saharan Africa is driven more by economic factors than conflicts, the continent is home to millions of refugees and IDPs who are forced to flee their homes because of persecutions, social unrests and climate change. The current state of forced displacement in Africa presents a number of socio-economic and political challenges which need to be addressed in order to reverse this trend and reduce the number of people in need of international protection.

The report is available here.

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